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Firemen on Gull again

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  • #4354
    ThomL
    Moderator

    The "I own the river" rescue guy is back. Yesterday he had his truck parked so that it was completly blocking the trail by the footbridge.:roll:

    Look for them to set their ropes at Earls again today. He told a couple of folks that he would put the ropes high enough to allow boats to pass under, but they will still have 15 or so newbies swimming and zip-lining on that section of the river.

    My advice: [b:2aoa5tkt]don’t[/b:2aoa5tkt] avoid that section of river. They need to see that they are monopolizing the best section of the river.

    #28405
    cmnypny
    Participant
    "ThomL":9biqbm6y wrote:
    The "I own the river" rescue guy is back. Yesterday he had his truck parked so that it was completly blocking the trail by the footbridge.:roll:

    Look for them to set their ropes at Earls again today. He told a couple of folks that he would put the ropes high enough to allow boats to pass under, but they will still have 15 or so newbies swimming and zip-lining on that section of the river.

    My advice: [[u:9biqbm6y]b]don’t[/b][/u:9biqbm6y] avoid that section of river. They need to see that they are monopolizing the best section of the river.[/quote:9biqbm6y]

    truck on trail …. nothing that a rescue nice couldn’t take care of …. how many rescue guys does it take to change 4 flat tires!

    #28406
    Open Gate
    Participant
    "cmnypny":3qyy6974 wrote:
    …. nothing that a [b:3qyy6974]rescue nice[/b:3qyy6974] couldn’t take care of …. how many rescue guys does it take to change 4 flat tires![/quote:3qyy6974]

    Now that would not be very NICE wouldn’t it ??? :lol: These nices sure are sharp… I guess they would need a nice rescue to get back home…

    :lol:

    #28407
    Ian Colbert
    Participant

    I was up there yesterday while they were sending guys across the bottom, they were actually quite decent. There seemed to be an unspoken agreement, that for every 2 of their guys who jump in, that one of us would go through and/or play…..there was no problem at all. However, I left rather early and at that point they did not have lines choking the river either. I do agree with Tom…DON’T AVOID THE RIVER.

    Cheers,

    Ian

    #28408
    markpospisil
    Participant

    They are firefighters not firemen…maybe if we were more careful with how we addressed thwm they would get in the way….Kidding
    Except for the firefighter part. My buddy hates being call a fireman, because he’s a "firefighter".

    #28409
    Hipnazi
    Participant

    Last crew was actually policepersons.

    Most of the clients this company brings are training to be firefighters, so not actually onthe job yet.

    Whether they are men or not doesn’t matter.

    The issue is not that they come, who they are or what we call them the issue is how one group of them feel it is within their right to take control of an entire section of an exceedingly busy piece of whitewater.

    Our own kind take these training sessions elsewhere in order to avoid conflict as well as maintain a safe training enviroment.

    These guy’s make every paddler that comes to the river a part of their training drills by trying to share the river while using ropes from bank to bank. This creates a higher risk situation than is neccesary. It involuntarily drags evryone passing into the increased risk without consent.

    I say it’s arrogant and presumptuious, at times breaks the law and instills in these trainees that they have the right to take this control of these kinds of places if it suits them.

    Of course in a real rescue deal authorities should and can take control over a waterway.

    Last visit they lost a rope in the river, left it unattended and were headed home when a paddler suggested they needed to do something about it. They declined as they have before when leaving ropes in the river. That paddler with help removed the rope. It was located directly around and under a gate set for last weekends race. Although unlikely (paddlers tend to pay attention) this could have lead to a very ugly deal for an unsuspecting racer.

    This group does not practice what they preach, they use redundant and outdated technique. They practice impractical scenarios and all with little regard for the real safety of paddlers or even their own clients.

    One student swam the falls last week after having no less then 4 throw ropes tossed by students fail.STUDENTS, 4 ropes in the narrowest section of the Gull all missed and then this POOR untrained student swims the worst drop on the river.
    No aggressive swimming, no decent safety and one day of whitewater exposure and this guy has his clients doing swimming drills at Earl’s. What else would one expect.

    #28410
    pursuits
    Participant

    Myself and matt Robertson were the ones that had to get the rescue rope out of the river. it was stuck deep under the pillow rock just out and down from cave eddy. I belayed Matt out on a live bait and even when diving down, couldn’t release all of the rope. he cut it down as far as he could go, but there is still about 20 ft of rope still out there. when I took what was left of the rope and bag back to the rescue people, all they said was thanks. they didn’t seem at all concerned about the fact they had just left it. I must say, that they were very polite for the 2 days and were always looking out for boaters. I think that someone needs to ask the fellow who runs this course, if the gull is really the place for this, or better yet, should they be doing it above the falls.
    gail s.

    #28411
    markpospisil
    Participant

    The following is an incident report from AWW – Colorado River – Gore Canyon: – Ropes=Trouble when left behind.

    Gore Canyon, a popular Class V run on the Upper Colorado, had not seen a fatality until this year. But in early August there were two deaths in two days! On August 1st, the date of the first accident, the river was running at a moderate 1120 cfs. Mark Gober, who was with the victim�s party but had decided to walk out, watched his group from the railroad bed as they attempted Kirschbaum Rapid. His description follows: A kayaker, running third in a group of four, ran a different chute and slammed into an underwater rope that had strung itself across a chute. He was violently peeled from his boat and forced to swim. The two paddlers below chased him and his gear. Matt Classon, 27, ran next. He, too, hit the rope hard. His boat floated free, but his body did not. Gober�s group made an extensive search of the entire area, checking eddies and probing the upstream faces of rock. In the process they found a pinned kayak. Thinking that their friend could have been pinned underneath it, they pulled it free using a Z-drag. They found nothing. Eventually they paddled out and notified authorities. Rescuers began a search early the next morning, and Classon�s body was found miles downstream, near the takeout. His helmet had been torn off and he had a serious head wound. This is not the first death resulting from an abandoned throw rope in the river. There was much speculation on Mountainbuzz.com about the source of the rope. Apparently it had nothing to do with the pinned kayak. Fortunately, a group of boaters who ran the river later were able to remove this hazard. If your rope becomes snagged, spare no efforts to remove it. The rope can be cut very close to the point of entanglement and left in place as a last resort.

    #28412
    Alex Gill
    Participant

    Myself and a friend pulled the rest of the rope out of the river on Monday or Tuesday evening. There was about a 20-25 section of rope flapping in the current just behind that second pillow rock (at the moment). Literally took us 30 seconds to pull out, there was a knot tied in the lie stuck between some rocks on the bottom. It should makes some nice line for painters.

    #28413
    ThomL
    Moderator

    BIG Thanks to the folks that went out of the way to clear that rope from the river. In light of the hazard that a rope creates, I am appalled that this guy has left ropes in the river several times. His attitude toward the river is perplexing. Unlike paddlers, he seems to have very little "connection" to the place….as if it is just another place to work.

    #28414
    chris mack
    Participant

    With their behaviour maybe they should not be allowed to stay at the campground.

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