Return to Boater Board

Sweet helmet multi-use?

Home Page Forums Boater Board Sweet helmet multi-use?

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2798
    harris
    Participant

    Morning,

    I was thinking about doing a bit of skiing this winter. I was looking at sweet helmets and was wondering if the trooper half cut made for the ski/snowboard line would be comparable to the rocker halfcut for paddling or vice versa. Could I get just one of these and use it for skiing, paddling and possibly biking? Or is the construction so radically different that it wouldn’t be safe based on the type of impacts predicted for the material. So, if anyone has some helpful advice would be appreciated!

    Andrew

    #21892
    h2sk1
    Participant

    The helmet designs are actually quite different.

    They are designed with different impact types and thus are constructed differently:

    * ski helmets designed to keep you warm, yet often have features to allow venting in warm weather.
    * bike helmets are meant for single collision then throw them away. Obviously, sweet helmets are meant for multiple hits
    * ear protection is a more common option on ski helmets
    * bike helmets with their long backs can actually cause whiplash in ski/board falls. Notice how the back of a ski helmet is tight to the nape of the neck? This isn’t a fluke – it is based on research on how to protect during falls.
    * sweets are designed for hits at the top of the head. Snow/ski and bike helmets are not. Notice how little coverage you have at the back of your neck? This helmet will suck if you land on a rail when boarding.
    * lastly – bike and ski helmets have testing standards. Some standards are better than others, but they actually test that their helmets work. That can’t be said about kayak helmets, but that is another rant.

    In general, my head is worth more than anything, so I have 3 different helmets (bike/ski/boat) and don’t look back at the money spent. Helmets are actually quite cheap compared to many other sport things we spend our money on.

    #21893
    harris
    Participant

    Just looking at the website the description is more or less the same for the trooper and the rocker, including the double layer design. I’d probably only use it for ski/boating as I have a bike helmet already. Anyhow, thanks for the advice. I agree with your points, though you have to admit though that they look like pretty much the same helmet.

    #21894
    ThomL
    Moderator

    I snowboarded all last season in my Strutter….love it! I wasn’t in any conditions that required ear protection, and I don’t ride rails, so I am completly happy with it…especially the sun protection that it offers. Only downside is it’s tough to find goggles that will fit under the brim.

    #21895
    harris
    Participant

    You know where I can get one of the troopers in SW ontario? I like the colours better than the rocker.

    #21896
    h2sk1
    Participant
    "harris":26a3hz9l wrote:
    Just looking at the website the description is more or less the same for the trooper and the rocker[/quote:26a3hz9l]

    Harris. I agree. I was thinking more of the Strutter. Sorry. One thing to think about is the snow helmet has a goggle strap which is really really useful. The white water one doesn’t.

    #21897
    patrick
    Participant

    i think it depends on that type of riding you do: if you ride rails and do jumps and bmx or stree stunts on a bike then i think the helmet will be fine (as it is a slow impact crash similar to kayaking) thus having a multi-hit helmet would be good!

    HOWEVER if you ski-race or bike-race (road bike or xc bike) then a helmet that will crash once, will be likely a lot better. the idea is that the energy goes into blowing the helmet apart instead of being transfered to your skull/brain/backbone. ie. hitting a tree with your helmet: with a sweet style helmet the energy will virtually ALL go into your body as nothing but some minor potential elastic energy occurs in the foam and maybe some minor disformation of the shell. however in a crash-once they will actually absorb the energy into crushing the foam thus preenting it to going into your body…

    like h2sk1 said, sometimes it’s not worth it… that being said, i think for a lot of syles of sking/boarding/biking they would be as good or better

    #21898
    harris
    Participant

    Ok – this is unrelated to boating but I am going to check out some prices on skiis and equipment on my lunch break. If anyone here is a skier what are some good brands and equipment to look into as far as boots, skiis etc go? It doesn’t have to be entry level but I’m not going to break the bank either.

    #21899
    h2sk1
    Participant
    "harris":39n8uinc wrote:
    Ok – this is unrelated to boating but I am going to check out some prices on skiis and equipment on my lunch break. If anyone here is a skier what are some good brands and equipment to look into as far as boots, skiis etc go? It doesn’t have to be entry level but I’m not going to break the bank either.[/quote:39n8uinc]

    Ooh. My favorite topic. Almost every boot brand sold in a reputable ski shop is good. Don’t listen to your friends who say "BRAND XXX makes the best boots". Each boot manufacturer fits differently. For example, if you have a wide foot, look into Technica or Atomic. Do you have a narrow foot? Lange and Rossi are good fits. Salomon tends to fit a bit wider, but not as much as Technica. Most boots have some form of heat moulding, but that is not a substitute for a boot fitting well prior to the minor adjustments. If the boot fitter is having you try on the shell with NO liner in it, and is making you walk around the store for a long time once you have something that looks like it fits, that’s a good store. If they don’t do that, turn around and walk out. A good fitting boot is critical — the brand isn’t.

    Skiis? That quite personal. I like the stiffness and hard tail of an Atomic ski. Many people like the forgiveness of the Rossi, but that doesn’t fit my style of skiing. If you can afford to wait until the snow flies to buy skiis, it would be best. Call up Chickopee or Devils and find out when the demo van will be in the area. Try skis all day long from different brands. Once you find a ski that works for you, you’ll be amazed how bad the other skiis feel.

    #21900
    harris
    Participant

    Cool, thanks. What do you think of Garmont boots?

    #21901
    CRS1
    Participant

    Garamont boots are for Alpine Touring (not too sure of how much backcountry you get out in K-Town) and while they are great for their intended purpose they will not perform as well as a dedicated downhill boot. Also you may want to look at the boot binding interface since most AT boots will not work well with downhill bindings (although the reverse is not necessarily true). As with the post above go with a boot that fits (and depending on your level) and provides the stiffness you require. For skis, again it’s a what are you planning on using them for … racing, powder, allround? Once you narrow down your intended purpose then demo skis that fit your category…Just like kayaking you can get by with a good allround boat or get specific for conditions. Have fun shopping.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.